Wednesday, June 7, 2017

A Clash of Kings (A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 2) by George R. R. Martin

Star Rating : 4 out of 5
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Content Rating : HIGH

Backcover :
“A comet the color of blood and flame cuts across the sky. And from the ancient citadel of Dragonstone to the forbidding shores of Winterfell, chaos reigns. Six factions struggle for control of a divided land and the Iron Throne of the Seven Kingdoms, preparing to stake their claims through tempest, turmoil, and war. It is a tale in which brother plots against brother and the dead rise to walk in the night. Here a princess masquerades as an orphan boy; a knight of the mind prepares a poison for a treacherous sorceress; and wild men descend from the Mountains of the Moon to ravage the countryside. Against a backdrop of incest and fratricide, alchemy and murder, victory may go to the men and women possessed of the coldest steel...and the coldest hearts. For when kings clash, the whole land trembles.”
               
My Thoughts :
The Clash of Kings is book two in the epic series Game of Thrones, and these books should definitely be read in order. So this book is LONG! It took me forever to get through it. If the size of the book intimates you, try the audiobook. The only way I got all the way through it was because I was listening to the audio version (which is great by the way). Besides it being long, it’s a fantastic book. Martin has created a vibrant, detailed world that is easy to get swept up in.  

I gave this a rating of HIGH. Violence includes gory details of fights, rapes, beheadings, and more. Sexual content is high and includes a relationship between brother and sister. The language is very rough. Let just say there is a lot of sex, strong language, and violence in this book!
What I liked :
  • The Reader I listened to the audiobook on this one. Roy Dotrice is a great narrator. He has a different and unique voice for each character, even those with a small part to play. How he consistently keeps track of all the voices is amazing, especially once you read it and see how many many characters there are. Since, there are so many characters it’s hard to keep with all the names; however, I found that Dotrice’s voice portals helped me with just that.
  • The Characters – Martin is a master at characters. They are all compelling, either you hate them or you love them. They are so dynamic, developing and changing. The book is told from one character’s perspective for a while and then switches to another. The only problem with this is you will definitely have a storyline or two that are you favorite and you will inevitably wish he stays with that one longer or gets back to it faster.
  • The World – What’s an epic fantasy without an elaborate world to go with it? There are dragons, witches, warlock, shape-shifters, and so much more. Martin is so descriptive, you can see, smell, and touch the seven kingdoms.   

What I didn’t like :
  • The Length – I’m good with long books; but when I got to the end of this one and looked back at what all had actually happened, it wasn’t much! No wonder it’s taking Martin so many books to finish the story.

What Others Are Saying :

“[George R. R.] Martin amply fulfills the first volume’s promise and continues what seems destined to be one of the best fantasy series ever written.”—The Denver Post 

“The novel is notable particularly for the lived-in quality of its world, created through abundant detail that dramatically increases narrative length even as it aids suspension of disbelief; for the comparatively modest role of magic, Martin may not rival Tolkien or Robert Jordan, but he ranks with such accomplished medievalists of fantasy as Poul Anderson and Gordon Dickson. Here, he provides a banquet for fantasy lovers with large appetites—and this is only the second course of a repast with no end in sight.” —Publisher’s Weekly

 



Reviewed by Shayna Hinshaw

Pick up your copy at Amazon or Barnes and Noble.

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